Friday Links

What did everyone think of that “Game of Thrones” finale last weekend?

So, according to The Onion AV Club, Apple “obtained a patent on technology that will disable your phone’s camera when it detects a specific infrared signal,” suggesting that those using their iPhone at a concert might be thwarted. Believe it or not, we addressed this very topic in a 2011 post entitled “On iPhones, Surreptitious Concert Taping, and The Future.” Are we prescient?

Although we love craft brewers, we are not ready for cookie dough beer.

We here at Abnormal Use and Gallivan, White, & Boyd, P.A. hope that you have a safe and festive Fourth of July holiday weekend. Try not to do too much billable work over the long weekend. In fact, try to enjoy the world a bit without worrying about work for a few hours.

We’re a bit puzzled by our favorite legal tweet of late, but we still keep trying to imagine the scene depicted therein.

Friday Links

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Above, you’ll find the cover of Independence Day #2, a comic book adaptation published way, way back in the halcyon days of 1996 (to coincide with the release of the film). Well, as you may know, the film’s sequels hits theaters this week, and although we’re a bit hesitant to endorse it, we’ll probably see it. After all, we remember standing in line in early July of 1996 to see the first one (which morally obligates us to see the sequel). That’s how at works, or so we’ve been told.

As we mentioned yesterday, we will be at the North Carolina Bar Association Annual Meeting this weekend in Charlotte. Say hi if you see us, and be sure to follow the hashtag #NCBAAM16 on Twitter if you’re interested in the event.

Did anyone go see The Cure in concert last night in Charlotte?

If the representations in our favorite legal tweet of the week are true, we need to see Finding Dory (as we adore jokes about warning labels). See below, and hap tip to Bob Dorigo Jones.

Abnormal Use at the NCBA Annual Meeting

As you may know, we here at Abnormal Use often travel to conventions and meetings far and wide. As fate would have it, though, the North Carolina Bar Association’s Annual Meeting takes place in Charlotte, North Carolina, where we have an office (and where our editor, Jim Dedman, is based). Accordingly, Jim will be at the NCBA Annual Meeting, and we suspect he’ll be tweeting from it using the Annual Meeting’s official hashtag, #NCBAAM16. In fact, as you’ll see below, he’s already at it.

If you also happen to find yourself at the meeting, be certain to say hello!

Friday Links

We here at Abnormal Use are nostalgic persons, and we must commend the dear YouTube user who posted a video of a 1996 drive through the City of Austin, Texas (which our editor once called home). It’s a trip back in time, and you can watch the video here.

Country music singer David Allan Coe now finds himself in legal trouble with the IRS.

Don’t forget that HeroesCon takes place in Charlotte, North Carolina this very weekend.

Our favorite legal tweet of late comes from Judge Dillard, and you can find it below.

Friday Links

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Enough said: Please consider the arguments set forth in “Why you Need to Stop Typing and Start Dictating” from the Tips for Lawyers website. Very important lessons here, folks. We’ve run into a lot of younger lawyers who believe that their savviness with computers prompt an aversion to dictation. As the article suggests, though, there’s nothing more efficient than using the dictation process to place your thoughts onto the written page (unless your Superman, depicted above on the cover of Superman #27, published way, way back in 1944).

Of course you know that many of our Abnormal Use bloggers also use Twitter. Today, we direct you to the Twitter account of longtime Twitter user Stuart Mauney whose tweets you can follow here. (In fact, it was Stuart who directed us to the dictation article referenced in the preceding paragraph!). Enjoy his tweets!

Don’t forget that the new Band of Horses album arrived today.

After the nonsensical insurance claim subplot in Now You See Me, we have no interest in seeing the new sequel.

There is, apparently, a 1993 issue of Fantastic Four entitled “Chaos in the Courtroom.” You’ve been warned.

Brewery Law CLE In Charlotte on June 9

If you find yourself in Charlotte, North Carolina this Thursday, June 9, please join the Mecklenburg County Bar for an upcoming brewery law seminar. The bar’s Continuing Legal Education Committee plans a number of very interesting events, including programs on the Salem witch trials (featuring colonial historian and novelist Katherine Howe), the fascinating tort of alienation of affection (for a Halloween event at which presenters also explored the legal implications of the Ashley Madison hack), and of course, the regulation of North Carolina breweries.

Its next program is the “What’s Brewing with Regional Alcohol Laws?” event, which takes place this coming Thursday, June 9 starting at 5:15 p.m. The program will explore the laws governing the interstate shipment of alcohol, trademark issues, and other craft brewery legislation in both North and South Carolina. The roster of speakers is impressive; it includes lawyer and South Carolina Brewers Guild executive director Brook Bristow of Bristow Beverage Law, Raleigh beverage industry attorney Laura Collier of Strike & Techel Beverage Law Group LLP, and Carrboro trademark law guru Ed Timberlake of Timberlake Law, PLLC. Both Laura Collier and Ed Timberlake have spoken at past brewery law events in North Carolina, and they are not to be missed. This event will be Brook Bristow’s first speaking event at a brewery law program in North Carolina. The event will be held at the Birdsong Brewing Company on North Davidson Street in Charlotte. Known for its famed Jalapeño Pale Ale, Birdsong also brews a seasonal wheat ale called Fake Plastic Trees, named for the sublime 1995 Radiohead single.

The general public is welcome to register for the event. If you’re an attorney desiring CLE credit, it can be yours, but if you’re not and/or you don’t, there are other pricing options (including a $25 general public rate). Registration information, speaker biographies, and more specific program information can be found here.

The event was planned by our editor, Jim Dedman.

Friday Links

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You may have heard the troubling news that Marvel Comics has unveiled a new storyline in which it is revealed that Captain America was a double agent, secretly serving Hydra all of these years. Outrage ensued. (We would direct your attention to “The Character Assassination of Captain America,” a post by Josh Gilliland of The Legal Geeks). We’re not quite certain what to think about this new narrative, but we thought it was a good opportunity to post the cover to What If #26, published way, way back in 1981. Back then, there was a storyline involving Captain America becoming president. In this issue of What If, the writers imagine what would have happened had Cap been elected. Interesting thoughts during this election year, no?

Not long ago, we once again stumbled across “Me and Chuck E. Cheese,” a 2009 blog post detailing the perils of working for the chain. To be certain, it’s worth your time to peruse.

You know, we still haven’t seen X-Men: Apocalypse. We’re working on it.

We here at Abnormal Use are pleased to announce that our firm, Gallivan, White, & Boyd, P.A., has been selected for inclusion in the 2016 edition of Chambers USA, Leading Lawyers for Business as a Leading Law Firm in Commercial Litigation. Additionally, firm attorneys Daniel B. White, Gray T. Culbreath, and John T. Lay, Jr. were chosen as leading business attorneys in the field of Commercial Litigation.

Memorial Day

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We here at Abnormal Use and Gallivan, White, & Boyd, P.A. hope you had a safe and fine Memorial Day weekend. As we do each year, today, we pause to reflect upon all of the sacrifices made by American servicemen and women and all they have done for the country, both in present times and years past. Above, you’ll find the cover of War Comics #34, published way, way back in 1955.

We’ll resume with regular posting tomorrow.

Friday Links

We here at Abnormal Use had, of course, hoped to see X-Men: Apocalypse at the theatre late last night, but as it does, life got in the way. We plan to see it this weekend (or, if that plan fails, catch up on episodes of “The Americans.”) That sounds like a wonderfully lazy agenda. (And, no, we’re not planning on attending tonight’s Dave Matthews Band concert in Charlotte, North Carolina).

Friend of the blog Jeena Cho’s new book, The Anxious Lawyer, arrives in stores next week!

We hope everyone has a safe Memorial Day weekend! Try not to do any billable work this weekend, as you’ve earned a break.

Don’t forget that you can follow Abnormal Use and Gallivan, White, & Boyd, P.A. on Twitter by visiting here!

What Are Smart Contracts?

As you know, we here at Abnormal Use find ourselves members of a number of legal groups, including the North Carolina Legal Geeks, which puts on several programs per year in the Charlotte area. If you find yourself in the Queen City tomorrow, Thursday, May 26, 2016, you might be interested in their latest program.

Called “What Are Smart Contracts?”, the program will feature local attorney and self professed legal hacker Tom Brooke will be speaking. Brooke is the founder of the North Carolina Legal Hackers, and as such, he knows a good bit about legal technology issues. He will be discussing how smart contracts will be used in the future as well as how they may affect the practice of law. As a refresher, our friends at Wikipedia have defined “smart contracts” as follows:

Smart contracts are computer protocols that facilitate, verify, or enforce the negotiation or performance of a contract, or that make a contractual clause unnecessary. Smart contracts usually also have a user interface and often emulate the logic of contractual clauses. Proponents of smart contracts claim that many kinds of contractual clauses may thus be made partially or fully self-executing, self-enforcing, or both. Smart contracts aim to provide security superior to traditional contract law and to reduce other transaction costs associated with contracting.

The event takes place Thursday, May 26, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. at Kickstand Charlotte located at 1101 Central Avenue in Charlotte.

For more information, see the event’s Facebook page here.