Apple Accused of Rigging iPhone to Fail

According to a report from Law360, Apple was sued Friday in a California federal court over an issue involving the iPhone 4’s power button. As you may know, there has been a great deal of Internet buzz among iPhone 4 users complaining that the power button becomes stuck or non-responsive after 1-year of usage. Because the button problems arose beyond the 1-year factory warranty, users were left without a remedy. Now, users are responding with a putative class action against the computer giant.

It is one thing to allege that a product is defective. It is quite another to allege that the product is rigged to fail just after the expiration of the warranty. Apparently, this is exactly what the class has done. It appears that the suit alleges that Apple not only knew and failed disclose the defective button, but also that it designed the button to fail as to render the phone unusable. That’s harsh.

We here at Abnormal Use do not have enough information to comment on the validity of the defect allegations. However, even if defective, we doubt Apple “rigged” the button to fail. What would Apple’s motivation be to do so?

We appreciate the rationale of a profit-motive argument, but it lacks an understanding of Apple buyers. iPhone users constantly upgrade their devices – broken power button or not. Apple releases new iPhone models every 6 months, making you feel that your barely used phone is outdated. Apple doesn’t need to tamper with your phone to get you to buy a new one. They already use enough trickery in the marketplace. Plus, we hope Apple users would be smart enough to move onto a new product line if the one you are using is defective.

It will be interesting to see how this suit plays out. Of course, Apple probably has the case rigged, right?

Comments

  1. Pingback: iPhone User Claims Apple Knew Power Button Would Fail | Mercho Legal Services, LLC

  2. peter baker says:

    Interesting to see how Apple were supposed to have designed an essentially mechanical part to fail in an exact timeframe, when each user will have differing use patterns in different environmental conditions