Friday Links: A Few Good Men Edition

As you know, each Friday, we  share some links to other sites and articles of interest.  Keeping with this week’s theme – the commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of the release of A Few Good Men – we’ve collected some links related to the film.

Here’s an interesting piece from The New York Times, published last year, noting that at least four former military lawyers have claimed to be the lawyer upon which the A Few Good Men‘s protagonist is based. How about that? It wasn’t one of us, that’s for certain.

Did you know that in 2008 the ABA Journal named A Few Good Men Number 14 on its list of Top 25 Greatest Legal Movies?

In an article, also from 2008, M. J. Tocci explains that A Few Good Men teaches us that “jurors give their own meaning to the different ways that men and women express themselves.”

Here is the official blog of the U.S. Navy JAG Corps.

Check out Roger Ebert’s original review of A Few Good Men, originally published on December 11, 1992. Interestingly, Ebert feels that the film spoils the climactic “You can’t handle the truth scene” by featuring a scene in which Cruise’s character previews the strategy.  Here’s what Ebert had to say on that point: “What happens is that the movie brings us to the brink of a courtroom breakthrough, and then we get the scene that undermines everything, as Cruise explains to his friends what he hopes to do, how he hopes to do it, and how he thinks it will work. When Nicholson’s big courtroom scene develops, we realize with sinking heart that it is following the movie’s scenario. That robs us of pleasure two ways: (1) We are not allowed the pleasure of discovering Cruise’s strategy for ourselves, and (2) Nicholson’s behavior seems scripted and inevitable, and is robbed of shock value.”

If you enjoyed our coverage of the twentieth anniversary of A Few Good Men, go back and check out our articles commemorating the twentieth anniversaries of My Cousin Vinny and Class Action!

Comments

  1. Back in 1991 my partner at the all service trial course/competition was the Marine prosector Kevin Bacon’s character was based on.

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